Probiotics for CFS

In my last post, I looked at a variety of herbs and spices to correct the shift of the microbiome (gut bacteria) seen with CFS. In this post, I am attempting to do a similar summary for probiotics.

Why is this important? Consider Bifidobacterium which is very low in CFS patients. It has been found to “synthesize at least 19 amino acids and (…) all of the enzymes that are needed for the biosynthesis of pyrimidine and purine nucleotides” [2015]  The question of why CFSers are low in various amino acids appears to have an answer.

Similarly, “Lactobacilli and bifidobacteria strains from VSL#3 and Lactobacillus GG did not induce interleukin 8, whereas both cell debris and cell extracts from E. coli Nissle 1917 [Mutaflor] induced interleukin 8 production in a dose-dependent way.”[2002]. E.Coli is extremely low in most CFS patients.

Not just CFS – but likely most autoimmune conditions

This does not apply only to CFS but also Rheumatoid Arthritis[RA] “The signs of 3rd degree dysbiosis [in RA], by reducing the concentration of Bacteroides spp., Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus spp. populations, typical strain E. coli. with [high levels of] Enterococcus (Hly+), Klebsiella spp., Proteus spp., Staphylococcus spp., lactosonegative and E.coli (Hly+) ” [2014]

Persistance

When taking probiotics, you need to be aware that some are “flow thru” and others may take up residence.

“After oral consumption of probiotics, E. coli [Mutaflor] and enterococci [Bioflorin] could be detected in stool samples (57% and 67%, respectively). In contrast, with only one exception, ingested lactobacilli and bifidobacteria could not be detected in human feces.” [2007]

The results for lactobacilli and bifidobacteria may be heavily influence on when and how the later two probiotics are taken as reported in this earlier post.

Strain differences

“In children, L. casei rhamnosus Lcr35, but not L. rhamnosus GG, showed a beneficial effect.” [2010] The literature is very sparse on this information. 🙁

Finding PubMed (reliable) literature of probiotic interactions is more time consuming  and difficult then with herbs and spices. I have constructed a table below based on my current findings. Feel free to forward any solid PubMed articles to me that you find to fill in the gaps.

Screen Shot 2016-01-01 at 9.33.50 AM

Probiotic

Klebsiella/ Enterobacteria

Enterococcus

E.Coli

Bifidobacterium

Lactobacillus

Persists

Single Strain

Bifiform

Decreases

Shifts

Decreases Bad

Additive

Additive

n/a

 

Miyarisan

Decreases

 

Decreases Bad

Increases

Increases

< 3 days

Clostridium butyricum

Mutaflor

Decreases

Decreases

Additive

 

 

Yes

E. Coli Nissle 1917

Bifidobacterium

Decreases

 

Decreases

Additive

Decreases

No

 

Lactobacillus

Decreases

 

Decreases

Decreases

Additive

No

 

Bioflorin 

Decreases

Shifts / Addtive

Decreases

Increases

Increases

Yes

Enterococcus faecium SF 68

Enterogermina 

Decreases

 

 

 

Yes

Bacillus clausii

 

Should I continue with Bifidobacterium and Lactobacilli

The simple answer is yes! But selectively!!!!

  • Bifidobacterium probiotics are often mis-identified, so unless it is a single strain, don’t worry about it and change brands regularly. See this post. We want their transitory benefits until the dysfunction is corrected.
  • For Lactobacilli — only a few families and strains should be considered. L. Reuteri is one of those. L. Acidophilus should be totally avoided.

Bifiform

During my research, I came across this probiotic shown above. It is available in Denmark, Sweden and eastern European countries. It contains:

  • Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (LGG®) 100 million cfu**
  • Bifidobacterium BB-12® 100 million cfu**
  • Thiamin (B1) 0.4 mg
  • Vitamin B6 0.5 mg